Thursday, April 06, 2006

Clothing Design



This month my focus is clothing design. I believe this will take the majority of my focus, and might as well bleed into the following months. Today I've engaged the local Barnes 'n' Noble for a book-hunt. Above are the books I have purchased, from left to right:

"Fadings
Graffiti to Design, Illustration, and More. 24 Profiles".
I had to have it when I saw it. What can I say? I am an art-book whore. If you've ever been to my place, you know that the first thing you see as you enter the door is a bookshelf filled with the stuff.

"Fashion Design by Sue Jenkyn Jones"
An EXCELLENT book that covers everything about fashion design, from clothing design historical context, the craft of sewing and choosing the right fabric, design principles, color choice, style, producing a collection, and all the way down to finding employment in this field, as well as a list of recommended resources.

"Inspirability
40 Top designers speak out about what inspires."
This book is just what I need at the moment, finding out what inspires others and how to motivate myself to do more design-related work.

And on the top right, a book I already have "Fruits". A photobook from Phaidon that documents the extreme liberal fashion sense in a city in Japan.

I also want to share a bit of sketches I've been doing.





For now, all male clothing designs will be for myself (and some of my friends). They will have a more hip-hop sensibility that merges with a "Heavy Red" style of gothic flavor. The colors will be mostly blacks as a base and sharp and distinct lines of bright greens and reds.

For female clothing I will be photographing all of the work on either friends or models (if you know any who would do shoots for free for their portfolio, let me know!) and simply giving the stuff away at the end. Possibly keep a few for myself, too (for portfolio purposes, you sick bastards).

My approach will be a mix of things I make from scratch as well modifying things I find in thrift stores (this is EXTREMELY helpful for a newbie such as myself..). Also, I'm thinking of attending some evening classes for sewing and other technical knowledge. If you guys know of anything you can recommend, please let me know :)

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Anonymous said...

Hello. Prompt how to get acquainted with the girl it to me to like. But does not know about it
I have read through one history
Each of you has your personal story; it is your history. Keeping a diary or writing your feelings in a special notebook is a wonderful way to learn how to think and write about who you are -- to develop your own identity and voice.

People of all ages are able to do this. Your own history is special because of your circumstances: your cultural, racial, religious or ethnic background. Your story is also part of human history, a part of the story of the dignity and worth of all human beings. By putting opinions and thoughts into words, you, too, can give voice to your inner self and strivings.

A long entry by Anne Frank on April 5, 1944, written after more than a year and a half of hiding from the Nazis, describes the range of emotions 14-year-old Anne is experiencing:

". . . but the moment I was alone I knew I was going to cry my eyes out. I slid to the floor in my nightgown and began by saying my prayers, very fervently. Then I drew my knees to my chest, lay my head on my arms and cried, all huddled up on the bare floor. A loud sob brought me back down to earth, and I choked back my tears, since I didn't want anyone next door to hear me . . .

"And now it's really over. I finally realized that I must do my school work to keep from being ignorant, to get on in life, to become a journalist, because that's what I want! I know I can write. A few of my stories are good, my descriptions of the Secret Annex are humorous, much of my diary is vivid and alive, but . . . it remains to be seen whether I really have talent . . .

"When I write I can shake off all my cares. My sorrow disappears, my spirits are revived! But, and that's a big question, will I ever be able to write something great, will I ever become a journalist or a writer? I hope so, oh, I hope so very much, because writing allows me to record everything, all my thoughts, ideals and fantasies.

"I haven't worked on Cady's Life for ages. In my mind I've worked out exactly what happens next, but the story doesn't seem to be coming along very well. I might never finish it, and it'll wind up in the wastepaper basket or the stove. That's a horrible thought, but then I say to myself, "At the age of 14 and with so little experience, you can't write about philosophy.' So onward and upward, with renewed spirits. It'll all work out, because I'm determined to write! Yours, Anne M. Frank

For those of you interested in reading some of Anne Frank's first stories and essays, including a version of Cady's Life, see Tales From the Secret Annex (Doubleday, 1996). Next: Reviewing and revising your writing

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